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12 Things I'd Change On Hospital Compare



Hospital Compare is a valuable, yet deeply flawed tool for reporting on hospital quality measures. It doesn't have to be that way.



4 comments on "12 Things I'd Change On Hospital Compare"
Teresa Ryals, RNIII/Quality Management (1/10/2014 at 7:49 AM)

As someone who has reported data to CMS for our facility since the 10 Starter Measures, I agree with this article. One thing not mentioned is the large number of hospitals that have "too few cases" to report. The majority of the hospitals reporting have fewer than 100 beds, many less than 50. Ours has 21. Curious as to how, if numbers were reported no matter how small, would effect the results.
Michael Cylkowski (1/9/2014 at 5:34 PM)

Nice article Cheryl. I would like to see more actual outcomes data like the kind Walmart looks at to determine their Centers of Excellence. That would be meaningful.
Leah Binder (1/9/2014 at 5:15 PM)

A superb analysis of the politically-motivated shortcomings of Hospital Compare.
Casey Quinlan (1/9/2014 at 3:44 PM)

My #1-with-a-reflex-hammer: "R. Adams Dudley, MD, of UCSF says CMS should consider organizing Hospital Compare with the patient rather than the practitioner in mind. 'Get inside the consumer's head and organize our thinking by symptom" or by patient function, he says.'" A-blinkin'-MEN to that. The people actually making the evaluations and comparisons are the patients. Providers too often default to "the guys I know" with no exploration of the outcomes of "the guys." Outcomes improvement, and overall system improvement, ain't down that usual suspects pathway. Love this piece. Should be hammered onto the door of every hospital across the US.