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For Small Health Systems, Big Decisions Can Mean Life or Death



Seeking a strategic path for a healthcare organization amid historic levels of disruption can be exhilarating, but small systems and standalone hospitals are essentially betting their institutional lives on the changes they're making.



1 comments on "For Small Health Systems, Big Decisions Can Mean Life or Death"
Robert C. Bowman, M.D. (2/18/2014 at 9:45 AM)

Since 1986 I have considered rural hospitals and practices and physicians to be endangered species. The current changes to their environment takes away their food and water, making them more endangered than ever. Unfortunately this endangers the tens of millions that they serve. This is close, but still does not quite get it right. Efficiencies can be demonstrated in those bigger and unorganized because they are bigger. Smaller is already efficient and has had to be to survive. Rural and smaller hospitals and practices do not need a niche. Niches are more expensive and are a poor fit with areas that need basic services and primary care and ER. Rural practices and hospitals are basic services, primary care, and ER if they can maintain a hospital against the barrage of forced increased investments and threats to revenue streams. 68% of Americans live in 40,000 zip codes in most need of the basics. Niche and competition is about 1100 zip codes with 10% of the population, and 45% of workforce.