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Stanford Medicine Children's Opens Innovation Lab for Maternal Care

Analysis  |  By Eric Wicklund  
   June 06, 2024

The new simulation lab will use new technologies and interactive labs to train healthcare workers on care management for pregnant women and their children

Stanford Medicine Children’s Health is launching a new innovation lab aimed at improving care for pregnant women and their children.

The Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Simulation Innovation Center will use AR, digital health-enabled mannequins, and other tools and technology to give healthcare workers a more hands-on education on a wide variety of health concerns, from difficult births to neonatal care.

“The Innovation Center is … a tool for enhancing care delivery, research, and quality improvement initiatives,” Kristine Taylor, DNP, executive director of the Innovation Center and Center for Professional Excellence and Inquiry, said in a press release. “By analyzing simulation data and outcomes, healthcare teams can identify areas for improvement and implement evidence-based practices to enhance patient care.”

The 4,900-square-foot center is one of several innovative projects being launched across the country to address the nation’s high maternal mortality rate and significant care gaps in children’s health. The maternal mortality rate in 2022 was 22.3 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; that’s down compared with 32.9 per 100,000 in 2021, during the height of the pandemic, but still high compared to other developed nations.

[Also read: NYC Targets Maternal Health Care Gap With Mobile Program.]

Healthcare leaders at Stanford Children’s say the new center and technology will help train healthcare workers of all levels, even social workers, in an interactive learning environment that includes debriefing rooms, where they can go over what they’ve learned and discuss new ways of delivering care.

“We are able to enhance our critical thinking, decision-making, and communication skills, ultimately improving patient care outcomes without putting actual patients at risk,” Emily Tomich, RN, a triage nurse and labor and delivery nurse educator, said in the press release. “This is especially important in high-stress situations where clear communication is critical, from basic procedures to complex surgical techniques.”

Eric Wicklund is the associate content manager and senior editor for Innovation, Technology, and Pharma for HealthLeaders.


KEY TAKEAWAYS

The U.S. maternal mortality rate in 2022 was 22.3 deaths per 100,000 live births, a high rate among developed nations.

Health systems across the country are launching new programs aimed at improving care for pregnant women and their children.

The Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Simulation Innovation Center will use digital health technology to give care workers hands-on training on a variety of health concerns, from difficult births to neonatal care.


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