Skip to main content

The Patient as Care Team Member

By Sandra Gittlen  
   November 23, 2015

"People confuse patient-centered care with a customer service program. It's not; it's about partnerships between the clinicians and the patients and families," he says.

Roberson notes that shared decision-making needs constant attention, or else it could be back-burnered by competing priorities and changes in leadership. "Shared decision-making has to stay in the forefront. It's our job to explain the patient's role in his or her own healthcare," he says.

"People confuse patient-centered care with a customer service program. It's not; it's about partnerships between the clinicians and the patients and families."

For Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Berg, shared decision-making can be summed up as inclusion. "Ultimately, at the end of the day, it's about if the patients and families feel they were listened to, their opinions mattered, and they formed a care plan they were comfortable with," she says. "It's not about what decision they make, but that they are part of the decision."

Reprint HLR1115-7

Tagged Under:


Get the latest on healthcare leadership in your inbox.