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Facing Pressure, Insurance Plans Loosen Rules For Covering Addiction Treatment

By Kaiser Health News  
   February 21, 2017

It sounds like just a technicality ― a brief delay before treatment. But addiction specialists say this red tape puts people's ability to get well at risk. It gives them a window of time to change their minds or go into withdrawal symptoms, causing them to relapse.

"If someone shows up in your office and says, 'I'm ready,' and you can make it happen right then and there ― that's great. If you say, 'Come back tomorrow, or Thursday, or next week,' there's a good chance they're not coming back," said Josiah Rich, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Brown University and doctor at Providence-based Miriam Hospital, who frequently treats patients with opioid addictions. "Those windows of opportunity present themselves. But they open and close."

As these major carriers drop the requirement, treatment specialists hope a trend could be emerging in which these addiction meds become more easily available. In New York, for instance, the attorney general's office will be following up with other carriers who still have prior authorization requirements, an office spokesperson said. The office would not specify which carriers it will next examine.

Meanwhile, though little research pinpoints precisely how widespread this coverage practice is for drugs that treat opioid addiction, experts say it's a fairly common practice.

"Just think of any big health insurance company that hasn't recently announced they're doing away with this, and it's a pretty safe bet they've got prior authorization in place," said Andrew Kolodny, a Brandeis University senior scientist and the executive director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing, an advocacy group.

Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.


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