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Analysis

Keys to Interoperability May be in Consumers' Hands

By smace@healthleadersmedia.com  
   November 15, 2016

Making patients the stewards of their own health data could result in better access, despite a business environment where health systems do not make sharing a patient's data with each other a top priority.

The barest outlines of the Trump Administration's healthcare policy were not yet clear on the morning after Donald Trump's upset presidential victory, but the CIO of a New York City health system was already looking forward to resolving issues unresolved by the election.

"If we were all on a common shared data platform and could easily access one another's patient data, I think we would do a much better job of keeping people healthy," said Daniel Barchi, senior vice president and chief information officer of New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York.

Speaking at the inaugural Techonomy Health conference last week in Half Moon Bay, CA, Barchi expressed hopes that the industry can agree to make patients the stewards of their own data moving forward.

In this way, he believes, patients can be at the center of sharing data in a business environment where health systems still do not make sharing a patient's data with each other a top priority.

"The standard [in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act] was so low," he said.

"I can send a couple of packets of data. You can send me a couple of packets of data and check the box. That's it. It's not really interoperable in any way. And the EMR vendor was really not incented in any way. They were just helping everybody get live on all these new systems."

No Incentive to Share Data
As a result, healthcare CIOs find themselves having built "really great complex systems within our own health systems, but aren't incented to share data in any way, and so we're doing it through a lot of back-door work," Barchi said.

He equated continuity of care (CCD) documents to "electronic faxes, a couple-of-page PDF version of somebody's care. Sure you can shoot it back and forth electronically, but you're not going to interact with it."

Scott Mace is the former senior technology editor for HealthLeaders Media. He is now the senior editor, custom content at H3.Group.


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